...to defeat the huns.

DeAnna aka Dee or Meowbooks. Student of Life. Hufflepuff. Whovian.
If you're just looking to see what I'll reblog: Optimism, Doctor Who, Harry Potter, Supernatural, things about social media, social issues, geeky things, Pirates of the Caribbean,NBC's Chuck, Game of Thones, Quotes and a slew of other stuff that tickles my fancy.



HOUSE UNITY
{ wear }
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toocooltobehipster:

[video]

(via bodysexgender)

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imperfectwriting:

I went to the mall, and a little girl called me a terrorist. 

My name is Ela.  I am seventeen years old.  I am not Muslim, but my friend told me about her friend being discriminated against for wearing a hijab.  So I decided to see the discrimination firsthand to get a better understanding of what Muslim women go through. 

My friend and I pinned scarves around our heads, and then we went to the mall.  Normally, vendors try to get us to buy things and ask us to sample a snack.  Clerks usually ask us if we need help, tell us about sales, and smile at us.  Not today.  People, including vendors, clerks, and other shoppers, wouldn’t look at us.  They didn’t talk to us.  They acted like we didn’t exist.  They didn’t want to be caught staring at us, so they didn’t look at all. 

And then, in one store, a girl (who looked about four years old) asked her mom if my friend and I were terrorists.  She wasn’t trying to be mean or anything.  I don’t even think she could have grasped the idea of prejudice.  However, her mother’s response is one I can never forgive or forget.  The mother hushed her child, glared at me, and then took her daughter by the hand and led her out of the store. 

All that because I put a scarf on my head.  Just like that, a mother taught her little girl that being Muslim was evil.  It didn’t matter that I was a nice person.  All that mattered was that I looked different.  That little girl may grow up and teach her children the same thing. 

This experiment gave me a huge wakeup call.  It lasted for only a few hours, so I can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day.  It reminded me of something that many people know but rarely remember: the women in hijabs are people, just like all those women out there who aren’t Muslim. 

People of Tumblr, please help me spread this message.  Treat Muslims, Jews, Christians, Buddhists, Hindus, Pagans, Taoists, etc., exactly the way you want to be treated, regardless of what they’re wearing or not wearing, no exceptions.  Reblog this.  Tell your friends.  I don’t know that the world will ever totally wipe out prejudice, but we can try, one blog at a time.  

(Source: olentaalla, via cuddles-the-dementor)

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rune-midgarts:

can we please stop antagonizing women who choose to wear makeup and pitting them against those who choose not to

(via canadiaplease)

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woodlandgoddess:

shiroulv:

i-dontshaveforsherlock-holmes:

keep-breathing-youre-okay:

stfufauxminists:

ianthe:

ltsparkles:

it-is-a-3-patch-problem:

Thought this may be useful for a few people on here!

This is a new app called ‘Self-help Anxiety Management' by The University Of West England

SAM has been developed by a university team of Psychologists, computer scientists and student users. It engages established methods of self-help and high standards of usability to provide a engaging, flexible & practical resource.

This app is currently only available for devices using Android.

omg i need a smart phone just for this app.

THIS LOOKS AMAZING

Signal boosting this as someone who has pretty debilitating anxiety just in case it could help someone else. I’m gonna give it a go.

sam is super fantastic and i definitely recommend it

just got this app and it is so incredible oh my god 

This application is also available on iOS. I have just downloaded it. I am amazed by the wealth of Android and iOS apps dedicated to anxiety reduction, self-CBT, and so forth. :)

This looks like it could be a godsend.

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radicalbytes:

I wrote an article attempting to identify some of the unearned benefits and privileges my fellow male gamers and I are afforded simply by virtue of being male. Please check out the full article in context over on Polygon.

  1. I can choose to remain completely oblivious, or indifferent to the harassment that many women face in gaming spaces.
  2. I am never told that video games or the surrounding culture is not intended for me because I am male.
  3. I can publicly post my username, gamertag or contact information online without having to fear being stalked or sexually harassed because of my gender.
  4. I will never be asked to “prove my gaming cred” simply because of my gender.
  5. If I enthusiastically express my fondness for video games no one will automatically assume I’m faking my interest just to “get attention” from other gamers.
  6. I can look at practically any gaming review site, show, blog or magazine and see the voices of people of my own gender widely represented.
  7. When I go to a gaming event or convention, I can be relatively certain that I won’t be harassed, groped, propositioned or catcalled by total strangers.
  8. I will never be asked or expected to speak for all other gamers who share my gender.
  9. I can be sure that my gaming performance (good or bad) won’t be attributed to or reflect on my gender as a whole.
  10. My gaming ability, attitude, feelings or capability will never be called into question based on unrelated natural biological functions.
  11. I can be relatively sure my thoughts about video games won’t be dismissed or attacked based solely on my tone of voice, even if I speak in an aggressive, obnoxious, crude or flippant manner.
  12. I can openly say that my favorite games are casual, odd, non-violent, artistic, or cute without fear that my opinions will reinforce a stereotype that “men are not real gamers.”
  13. When purchasing most major video games in a store, chances are I will not be asked if (or assumed to be) buying it for a wife, daughter or girlfriend.
  14. The vast majority of game studios, past and present, have been led and populated primarily by people of my own gender and as such most of their products have been specifically designed to cater to my demographic.
  15. I can walk into any gaming store and see images of my gender widely represented as powerful heroes, villains and non-playable characters alike.
  16. I will almost always have the option to play a character of my gender, as most protagonists or heroes will be male by default.
  17. I do not have to carefully navigate my engagement with online communities or gaming spaces in order to avoid or mitigate the possibility of being harassed because of my gender.
  18. I probably never think about hiding my real-life gender online through my gamer-name, my avatar choice, or by muting voice-chat, out of fear of harassment resulting from my being male.
  19. When I enter an online game, I can be relatively sure I won’t be attacked or harassed when and if my real-life gender is made public
  20. If I am trash-talked or verbally berated while playing online, it will not be because I am male nor will my gender be invoked as an insult.
  21. While playing online with people I don’t know I won’t be interrogated about the size and shape of my real-life body parts, nor will I be pressured to share intimate details about my sex life for the pleasure of other players.
  22. Complete strangers generally do not send me unsolicited images of their genitalia or demand to see me naked on the basis of being a male gamer.
  23. In multiplayer games I can be pretty sure that conversations between other players will not focus on speculation about my “attractiveness” or “sexual availability” in real-life.
  24. If I choose to point out sexism in gaming, my observations will not be seen as self-serving, and will therefore be perceived as more credible and worthy of respect than those of my female counterparts, even if they are saying the exact same thing.
  25. Because it was created by a straight white male, this checklist will likely be taken more seriously than if it had been written by virtually any female gamer.

(via fanculturesfancreativity)

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xkanyeinterruptedmex:

my-chemical-homestuck:

explosives-b:

sozziesocks:

She’s fourteen, and she already feels like shit for being born white and cis.

Fuck tumblr.

this makes me sad more than anything. The fact that people feel guilty for existing is sad.

oh poor white cis people

grow the fuck up; this site is one of the only places where minorities can vent and stupid cis people are offended

just stop

No, here’s the fucking thing. This site isn’t for one group of people. It’s a fucking blogging site. For EVERYONE. You tell people not to be ashamed of what they fucking are, but only of its what you want? That’s pretty fucking disgusting. If you want equality, you don’t preach hate, because hate breeds more hate. That 14 year old isn’t your oppressor. She has done nothing wrong to be forced to hate herself, and to hate what she was born in. Grow the fuck up.

(Source: gotchipoints-remade-666, via believeinprongs)

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nightkillertsuki:

syekick-powers:

demigray:

insertintellectualusernamehere:

Finally >:T
I am a proud Demisexual! And I always have a hard time explaining it to other people, let alone myself some times? But this makes it really easy ^^ please reblog and share this.

This is neat; I like it.

FINALLY AN EDUCATIONAL GRAPHIC THAT USES THE DEFINITION OF BISEXUAL THAT I ACTUALLY IDENTIFY WITH

I am aromatic.

(Source: weneedtotalkaboutcastiel, via the3rdjp)

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savethewailes:

BREAKING NEWS: THE INTERNET IS RUDE AS SHIT

Actually, not news.

As an artist, who already makes no fucking money at all, this kind of thing makes me so angry. 2 years ago, I posted the below photo series for Easter. I am happy with the traffic it got, it was nice to know people like my work. Blah blah blah. This is one of many repostings of just this one photo. 

But almost on a weekly basis, A WEEKLY BASIS, do I find other people posting my work, uncredited. What does this do to artists? NOTHING. It just makes them really cranky and mean. 

"But free publicity is good!"

Fuck you, that’s stealing, and it’s wrong. That’s like stealing organs from people and saying “But you should be happy we chose to take your kidney!” 

"But you should be happy your work is being seen by so many people! We are doing you a favor!"

No, you’re insulting me as a professional, and by doing this you are not telling me my work is worth my time, but are telling my my work is not good enough to have my name on it. 

"We can promote your work!"

No, I am doing that myself. If you sourced a reference, then I wouldn’t need you to promote my work because THE LINK IS ALREADY THERE. 

"I didn’t mean to!"

Every time an artist puts their work online, they post it on their website first, everything is linked together, it takes literally 7 seconds of your life to reverse Google image search something if you don’t know the original source. 

OH LOOK HERE IS A LINK TO REVERSE GOOGLE IMAGE SEARCH

I am sick of being a part time artist and a part time detective just to keep on people reposting my work, selling my work, or saying they made my work. 

These are all things I have had in response multiple times from people who have reposted my work. This is not including the many people who apologize earnestly and are very polite and dear about it. Those people just made mistakes, and fix them. The ones who get defensive and make excuses like they’re some kind of victim, are just dicks. 

I am not some cheap entertainer for you, I am a hard working artist and I wish people would once in a while acknowledge not just the art itself, but the person who made it. 

At the end of the day, I am genuinely happy people are seeing my work, and it seems to be bringing people happiness. It would just be nice for me to not be the last person to know that my work is even worth someone’s time to look at. 

When you don’t source your photos or art in postings, it tells the artist that their work isn’t worth it, and that there is no reason for them to keep posting things online, or even making art for people to see. 

Artists are generally friendly people, until you take our work from us. If you ever need resources to find out the source to a work of art, any artist will help you find tools to get you there. Just ask. 

TL:DR 

When you don’t source your photos, you tell the artist who made it that their work isn’t even worth their name, and that is the worst feeling in the world. 

(via jamesgatzisalyingshit)

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(Source: letstalkabouted, via internal-acceptance-movement)

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leeriverofwordsjordan:

realjusticewesteros:

x-sunnydragonfly-x:

mieko-nakatomi:

mid0nz:

buzzfeed:

Inside China’s Insane Witch Hunt For Slash Fiction Writers

Important.

I take for granted my ability to be a fangirl and a lesbian in the open, my freedom of speech. To be vocal about my joys, my erotic attachments. Meanwhile our fellow fans are being persecuted for what many of us experience as simple guilty pleasures. This is a vital issue and it deserves our collective attention.

A little more important than raging about some white girl trying to be kawaii.

When people can dictate your speech, they can dictate your life. Protect it like you would your very life.

This is not ok.

This is what real oppression looks like. Being detained for expressing yourself is just fundamentally wrong. No one was getting hurt.

But no, let us focus on how a song promotes “rape culture” here in America while the very same girls probably write all the erotic fanfiction they want.

-SS

They’re different forms of oppression and discussing both is important. The first with China is clearly at the more extreme and troubling end of the spectrum.  The second is the exercise of the rights we are allowed to have. However, just because the US has it better doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be critiquing songs we find problematic. Popular songs reflect the pulse of a culture at the time. We SHOULD be concerned when a song is spreading “rape culture” as a “fun” and catchy song. That’s sinister, too, because people say a song “doesn’t matter.” That’s silencing—whether intentional or not—the voice of rape or sexual abuse victims who ALREADY have to deal with their past. By saying the song doesn’t matter,by dismissing their concerns and their allies’ concerns, it’s perpetuating rape culture.

TL;DR: Censorship and rape culture are BOTH issues we should be discussing.

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sapphicnymph:

leaving Laverne Cox off of the Time top 100 despite the overwhelming support she received is an act of violence and erasure towards trans women

(via cxptnamerica)

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gwenlightened:

fit-journey:

fickspired:

thinsoundsgood:

This is a picture of me and my two gorgeous best friends. Clearly, we all have very different body types, and you know what? None of us is healthier, prettier or happier than the others because of it.


That’s me on the left. I’m short, super petite, and have about as much muscle mass as a blob of gelatin. Despite being naturally thin, I have always been far from in shape. Not even a month ago, running two minutes at a time was a struggle—now I can run without stopping for more than a half hour.

Felicia, in the center, is probably the most active girl I know. The opposite of me, she’s one of those people that can build muscle just by looking in the direction of a dumbbell. She loves running like I do, and we’ve discussed running a 5k. She’s a big yoga enthusiast and has tried all sorts of different forms that I can’t pronounce, and she’s found free community yoga classes for us to attend together. Also, she has abs of steel, seriously. She’s helping me with my ab workouts. She’s also recently lost over 60 lbs through her active lifestyle and healthy diet.

That’s my friend Maddy on the right. She’s curvy and feminine, but she’s a beast in the gym. Strength training is her thing. She could probably bench press two of me. Not only is she incredibly strong, she’s insanely flexible and an avid pole dancer. We’re taking classes together even though she can spin circles around me on that damn pole, and look gorgeous while she does it.

My friends inspire me so much, and remind me that diversity is lovely. You don’t have to be skinny to be beautiful and confident, nor do you have to look like girls in Nike ads to be strong and fit. You don’t need to weigh a certain number, fit into a certain size, or have a certain appearance to be confident, healthy, or happy. I think that my friends prove that to me.
 
I’ll never be long and willowy like a supermodel, or well-built like all those fitspo girls. I’ll never look like either of my friends, and they’ll never look like me. And that’s ok, because fitness is about being the best you can be, not comparing yourself to others.

Embrace what you have, and help others embrace what they have. Fitness is funner with friends. Get them involved. Take a class, go for a walk, make a healthy dinner together. You’ll always have support and a fun activity to bond over.

this is one of the best things i’ve read on tumblr. Friends come in all different shapes, colors and sizes. May your friendships be everlasting 

I just can’t NOT reblog this. Everyone should read it.

This was absolutely amazing, well worth the time to read, wow. Beautiful.

(Source: fivetwoandyou, via thechildrenof-lore)

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(Source: aerobicblaine, via persephoneshadow)

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sizvideos:

Watch Honey Maid’s awesome answer about the backlash they received 

(via persephoneshadow)

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The problem that needs to be fixed is not kick all the girls out of YA, it’s teach boys that stories featuring female protagonists or written by female authors also apply to them. Boys fall in love. Boys want to be important. Boys have hopes and fears and dreams and ambitions. What boys also have is a sexist society in which they are belittled for “liking girl stuff.” Male is neutral, female is specific.

I heard someone mention that Sarah Rees Brennan’s THE DEMON’S LEXICON would be great for boys, but they’d never read it with that cover. Friends, then the problem is NOT with the book. It’s with the society that’s raising that boy. It’s with the community who inculcated that boy with the idea that he can’t read a book with an attractive guy on the cover.

Here’s how we solve the OMG SO MANY GIRLS IN YA problem: quit treating women like secondary appendages. Quit treating women’s art like it’s a niche, novelty creation only for girls. Quit teaching boys to fear the feminine, quit insisting that it’s a hardship for men to have to relate to anything that doesn’t specifically cater to them.

Because if I can watch Raiders of the Lost Ark and want to grow up to be an archaeologist, there’s no reason at all that a boy shouldn’t be able to read THE DEMON’S LEXICON with its cover on. My friends, sexism doesn’t just hurt women, and our young men’s abysmal rate of attraction to literacy is the proof of it.

If you want to fix the male literary crisis, here’s your solution:

Become a feminist.