...to defeat the huns.

DeAnna aka Dee or Meowbooks. Student of Life. Hufflepuff. Whovian.
If you're just looking to see what I'll reblog: Optimism, Doctor Who, Harry Potter, Supernatural, things about social media, social issues, geeky things, Pirates of the Caribbean,NBC's Chuck, Game of Thones, Quotes and a slew of other stuff that tickles my fancy.



HOUSE UNITY
{ wear }
181992
notes

(Source: penicillium-pusher, via thesinkingsun)

14944
notes

ghostypajamas:

nonbinary people who are okay with gendered pronouns/names are still nonbinary and if a nonbinary person tells you they’re okay with gendered pronouns then it’s really not your place to say that their gender identity is less valid because of that, even if you yourself are nonbinary. Gender is different for everyone and there’s no “valid way” to be a certain gender the only validation you need is your own.

(Source: rairatrio, via canadiaplease)

0
notes

I wonder what would happen if I made a blog, wrote thoughts, expressed opinions and I didn’t tell people what my sex or gender or age or nationality or ethnicity was. I’d simply respond I’m a person and these are my thoughts and experiences and that’s all you need to know. 

All they would have to go on was what I posted. 

21427
notes

asexual-not-a-sexual:

I’ve recieved a lot of requests for a masterpost. 

So…I made one. 

Yeah. 

Like always, contact me with any changes. 

Like always, if you’re going to complain that demisexuality isn’t real, polysexuals are just confused, trans* people are liars, or asexuals need to get laid…. Just, I dunno, stop. 

(via forthepriceofasoul)

42879
notes

The following day, I attended a workshop about preventing gender violence, facilitated by Katz. There, he posed a question to all of the men in the room: “Men, what things do you do to protect yourself from being raped or sexually assaulted?”

Not one man, including myself, could quickly answer the question. Finally, one man raised his hand and said, “Nothing.” Then Katz asked the women, “What things do you do to protect yourself from being raped or sexually assaulted?” Nearly all of the women in the room raised their hand. One by one, each woman testified:

“I don’t make eye contact with men when I walk down the street,” said one.
“I don’t put my drink down at parties,” said another.
“I use the buddy system when I go to parties.”
“I cross the street when I see a group of guys walking in my direction.”
“I use my keys as a potential weapon.”

The women went on for several minutes, until their side of the blackboard was completely filled with responses. The men’s side of the blackboard was blank. I was stunned. I had never heard a group of women say these things before. I thought about all of the women in my life — including my mother, sister and girlfriend — and realized that I had a lot to learn about gender.